NRA Board Elections

Looking over the candidates’ bios, one thing stands out. All but one — Frank Tait — were hand-picked by the Nominating Committee. About 3/4 of those nominated by the Nominating Committee include (and usually begin with) that fact. Plus, the Nominating Committee report is printed on a full page right next to the ballot.

Our recommendations are simple. Interviews by the Nominating Committee can be very blunt. Not just how qualified or dedicated you are, but will you vote the way we want. It’s a sure thing that each candidate was grilled on “will you do nothing to rock the boat,” and didn’t pass the test unless they pledged undying loyalty to LaPierre, everyone else, and promised not to raise questions or ask for investigation.

That’s how you get what NRA has, a board of cowering sheep, who will let the NRA go down so long as LaPierre is captain when it goes under.

Here is Frank Tait’s webpage. We’ve decided we are voting for him, and him alone. That’s important. He’s got to overcome the Nominating Committee “home court” advantage. Don’t vote for 25 candidates. That just means giving 24 votes to people other than him, all of whom have the advantage anyway. Cast one vote and (if the votes are honestly counted) he might actually have a chance.

4 thoughts on “NRA Board Elections

  1. That’s how we cleared out the dead wood one year during an election for union delegates in the FOP. As long as you met the monthly attendance requirements, you could be nominated to be a delegate. The top nine vote getters got to go to conferences. Most of the positions would get filled with retirees who only wanted to go to conferences to get drunk on the union dime. So the still- working officers, the “actives” got together and had five candidates on the ballot. Worked together to vote for only those five. Yes, you could vote for up to nine, but you should only vote for those five. We had three of the worst retirees targeted as well and word went out that under no circumstances should you vote for these people. It worked. The five actives got on the board, which gave actives the majority of delegates, and the three worst retirees didn’t make the cut.

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